Spectacle Reef 

Spectacle Reef Light stands vigil in northern Lake Huron about 18 miles east of Cheboygan, Michigan marking one of the most treacherous stretches of the Straits of Mackinac.  An engineering feat, construction started on the spectacle shaped reef (hence the name) in 1870 and was completed four years later with the Light entering service in June of 1874.

 

It is the most expensive lighthouse on the Great lakes and is made of interlocking, hand cut limestone blocks with a height of 97 feet above the water and was equipped with a second order Fresnel lens with a range of up to 24 miles.   The Light also includes an attached fog building that was built in 1906 to house the two diaphone foghorns and the machinery for the operation of the station with additional storage below. The entire structure rests on a massive 86’ by 86’ steel encased concrete deck.  The tower contains seven floors including the balcony level and the lantern room.   There are also two below ground storage rooms outside the main structure accessible through hatches in the deck.

 

The lighthouse was automated in 1972 after almost 100 years of being a manned station, and the lens was removed in 1984 and is now on display at the Inland Seas Maritime Museum in Ohio.  The current light is a modern LED.

Waugoshance

The Shoal Shoppe is a husband and wife team dedicated to doing our part to preserve the history Michigan 's offshore Lighthouses. 100% of our profits go towards the restoration and preservation of the Lights we have the honor to represent.

Spectacle Reef 

Spectacle Reef Light stands vigil in northern Lake Huron about 18 miles east of Cheboygan, Michigan marking one of the most treacherous stretches of the Straits of Mackinac.  An engineering feat, construction started on the spectacle shaped reef (hence the name) in 1870 and was completed four years later with the Light entering service in June of 1874.

 

It is the most expensive lighthouse on the Great lakes and is made of interlocking, hand cut limestone blocks with a height of 86 feet above the water and was equipped with a second order Fresnel lens with a range of up to 28 miles.   The Light also includes an attached fog building that was built in 1906 to house the two steam whistles (later updated to diaphone foghorns) and the machinery for the operation of the station with additional storage below. The entire structure rests on a massive 86’ by 86’ steel encased concrete deck.  The tower contains seven floors including the balcony level and the lantern room.   There are also two below ground storage rooms outside the main structure accessible through hatches in the deck.

 

The lighthouse was automated in 1972 after almost 100 years of being a manned station, and the lens was removed in 1982 and is now on display at the Inland Seas Maritime Museum in Ohio.  The current light is a modern LED.

Waugoshance

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Waugoshance stands in the Straits of Mackinac of Lake Michigan and is believed to be the first offshore lighthouse built in Michigan, paving the way for many others.  Entering service in 1851 she features a conical tower with a two story crew quarters built upon a crib made of massive limestone blocks.  In the Light’s glory day she was clad in steel boilerplate colored with four horizontal white and red stripes and featured a unique “bird cage” style lantern room enclosing a fourth order Fresnel Lens. 

The Light was decommissioned in 1912 and later used for bomber training during World War II leaving her a broken, burnt out shell.    In more recent years the pounding waves have begun washing away the huge blocks that make up her foundation further threatening her stability. 

Waugoshance is considered one of the most endangered lighthouses in the world.

 
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About Us 

The Shoal Shoppe is a husband and wife team dedicated to doing our part to preserve the history Michigan 's offshore Lighthouses. 100% of our profits go towards the restoration and preservation of the Lights we have the honor to represent.

 

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